Choose Your Own Adventure: 3 Dental Specialties You Should Consider

Posted by on Mar 29, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Even though the image that probably jumps into your mind when you hear the word dentistry is your local dentist’s office, there are actually quite a few specialties when it comes to dentistry, just like in any other area of medicine. But if you’re looking into dentistry as a future career, it’s important that you know what your options are as far as specialization goes and what careers come out of those specialties. So if you’re looking for a quick guide on three of the more common dental specialties and what exactly they entail in practice, then here’s what you need to know. Orthodontia The specialty you’ll probably use once in your lifetime (and the first specialty to exist within the field of dentistry), generally around middle school age, orthodontia is the field of working with a person’s mouth to improve their bite and tooth alignment, usually through the use of tools such as spacers, expanders, and – most often – braces. The word itself demonstrates its purpose; it comes from the Greek roots orthos, which means straight, and odont, which simply means tooth. Dentists who mean to become orthodontists must go through additional schooling to earn their specialty; after graduating with a DDS, a dentist must then go through a two to three year course that culminates with a written test given by the American Board of Orthodontics. If the new orthodontist wants to take it a step further, they can be certified by that same Board, presenting 10 cases that they worked on and justifying the decisions they made in those cases to a panel of orthodontists. Oral Surgery The most “doctor-y” specialty for dentists, oral surgeons are those dentists that commonly work in hospital-like environments such as clinics, performing extractions and (most commonly) wisdom tooth surgery. Oral surgery isn’t limited to just teeth, however – oral surgeons can correct jaw shape, jaw disorders (such as TMJ) and can even perform cosmetic surgery on the bones of the face (usually the jawbone) to alter their patients’ appearance. In order to become an oral surgeon, a dentist must train an additional 4-6 years (6 being the most common duration in order to get an MD) past their dental degree, and can choose to go on for another two years after that if they wish to specialize further within their specialty in trauma or reconstruction (after tumors etc. have been removed from a jaw, for example). Cosmetic The fastest-growing specialty in dentistry, cosmetic dentistry is primarily concerned with aesthetics – how the mouth and jaw look and what can be done to improve their appearance. This is where teeth whitening, veneers, and small problems like slight overbites, a gummy...

Read More

4 Things To Know About Treating A Cavity

Posted by on Mar 22, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Cavities can be a nuisance to deal with throughout each day. For instance, a cavity can make it difficult to enjoy both hot and cold foods, as it can lead to a lot of pain. When a cavity becomes severe to the extent of the pain going away, it means that the pulp chamber has likely been exposes to bacteria. The reason why the pain goes away is because the nerves inside of the pulp chamber can die after being exposed to bacteria. Take a look at this article for some general information about what might go on when a dentist treats a cavity. 1. Infections Will Be Treated Before moving forward with taking care of your cavity, the dentist will have to treat infections that are present. The extent of treatment will be based on how severe the infection has progressed, such as if you are suffering from periodontitis. In the simplest case, you will simply have to take antibiotics for a short while before returning to the dental clinic. 2. A Root Canal Might Be Necessary If the dentist happens to find an abscess when your cavity is examined, you will likely need a root canal done. An abscess is dangerous because it has toxic fluid inside of it that can eventually harm your overall health. During the procedure, the dentist will not only release the toxic fluid, but will also get rid of diseased pulp. Basically, diseased pulp consists of dead nerves and tissue. 3. The Cavity Will Be Filled After infections and abscesses have been treated, the dentist will have to fill the cavity to close the hole it created. You can opt for different types of fillings based on how you want the results to look, as well as your budget. There are fillings that are the same color as your teeth, and there are also the cheaper ones that are dark and easily noticeable. Once the cavity has been filled in, you should be able to eat without the resin coming out, but it might need to be refilled in the long run if it gets loose. 4. A Crown Might Be Placed on Your Tooth Sometimes simply filling in a cavity in isn’t enough, such as if your enamel is severely decayed. In such a tooth, the dentist might have to put a crown on your tooth after it has been filled in. A crown will cover the entire tooth and prevent the enamel from breaking...

Read More

Root Canal Therapy And When It Is Needed

Posted by on Mar 17, 2017 in Uncategorized |

If you are like many people, you may have heard of root canal therapy but may not know much about it. This type of therapy is used to alleviate the discomfort that arises from dental nerves that have been irreparably damaged. Here is a bit of information about root canal therapy and when it is needed: What occurs during root canal therapy? As root canal therapy is performed, the material inside the tooth is removed, and the tooth is subsequently filled and capped. The innermost layer of a tooth is the pulp. This soft material includes the blood vessels and dental nerves of the tooth. When the pulp is removed, any discomfort associated with the tooth should be alleviated because the nerves are no longer present.  After the pulp’s removal, the interior of the tooth is thoroughly cleaned and disinfected. The tooth is then filled and covered with a suitable dental crown. A tooth-colored crown is usually selected for aesthetic purposes. What are some reasons that a root canal becomes necessary? A root canal can become necessary for a variety of reasons. Here are a few of them: Abuse of Over-the-counter Teeth-whitening Kits Teeth-whitening kits are considered safe, but they should only be used according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Kits that are used too often can result in chronic dental sensitivity. The nerves can become irreversibly inflamed by the chemicals used in the whitening products.  Severe Dental Infections If a tooth becomes infected, you may notice multiple symptoms, such as pain, discoloration of the tooth, an abscess on the gums near the tooth and an increase in dental sensitivity to pressure, cold and heat. The administration of an antibiotic to quell the infection may alleviate some of the symptoms, but if the nerves have been damaged during the infection, a root canal may be needed. Not only does the root canal remove any infected material that may be remaining in the tooth, but it also removes the inflamed dental nerves that cause your discomfort. Dental Decay A minor cavity may only breach the surface of the tooth enamel. However, deep cavities can invade the dentin and the underlying pulp, inflaming the nerves of the tooth. Root canal therapy may be necessary to relieve the pain and protect the tooth from further decay. To learn more about root canals and why they are performed, schedule an appointment with a dentist, such as Jeffrey S. Thaller DMD, in your...

Read More

Stop Rooting Around: Alternatives To A Root Canal Surgery

Posted by on Mar 10, 2017 in Uncategorized |

Root canal is perhaps the most horrifying word in a dental dictionary. When people hear that they need a root canal, many nearly recoil in fear. Needing a root canal can be difficult enough, especially if the tooth is in pain.  If you need a root canal but absolutely refuse to have the surgery, there are some alternatives. Some people are not aware that a root canal is just one action of many.  If you want to come up with an alternative to a root canal, here are some plans that you can put into action.  Pull the tooth and put in a bridge If the teeth surrounding the area that need the root canal are in good health, you can put in a bridge. First, you will need to get the tooth pulled. Once the tooth and root are healed, you can get fitted for a crown that will cover the missing tooth and a bridge to anchor it to the other teeth in the area. This solution works for everyone no matter what tooth size they are dealing with. This solution is also better when you only need one tooth replaced rather than several. Getting one tooth pulled and a bridge made can be cheap for those who are looking for a root canal alternative that will last for good.  Have the tooth pulled and replace with an implant Dental implants are a long-term solution to a missing tooth. If you need a root canal but do not desire to have this surgery, investing in an implant can be a good next step. First, you will need to have the tooth pulled and wait for the root and gum to heal. This process will take up to several weeks. Once the tooth has healed, you will be able to get the dental implant. During a dental implant, a screw is placed in the gums, where the root of the tooth previously resided. Attached to the end of the screw will be a tooth that was created specifically for you. Dental implants help to keep the gums healthy and strong, as well as offer a good long-term option. Dental implants can remain in your mouth forever, making them a permanent solution. If you need more than one root canal or if you have had a root canal on the same tooth more than once, a dental implant can save money and save your...

Read More

Things To Know About Periodontitis & Loose Teeth

Posted by on Mar 10, 2017 in Uncategorized |

When you have good oral health, you should not be able to wiggle any of your teeth. If you have noticed that a few of your teeth are loose, it likely means that you have weak jawbones. The most common reason for jawbones to get weak is from periodontitis, which is a severe form of gum disease. If you have periodontitis, you will need prompt treatment that might include extracting the loose teeth. Take a look at this article for more information about periodontitis and loose teeth. Why Periodontitis Is a Big Concern Periodontitis is a big concern because it can completely destroy your oral health. Being that you already have a few teeth that are loose, it is likely that your oral health is already in a severe condition. Basically, periodontitis usually develops from not getting gingivitis treated, which is a mild form of gum disease. A dentist can diagnose periodontitis based on the specific oral health problems that you have. Some of the problems that he or she will look for include dental abscesses, bleeding gums, excessive amounts of tartar, and rotten teeth. Treatment That Might Be Necessary Depending on how loose your teeth are, you might need to get them extracted. The reason why extraction might be necessary is because the teeth will eventually fall out anyway. However, if the teeth are only slightly loose, the dentist might be able to reserve them. Once periodontitis has been treated, your jawbones can begin to get stronger. You might also need to get your teeth thoroughly cleaned, have cavities filled, and take antibiotics. However, your specific condition is what will determine the type of treatment that is necessary. How Extracted Teeth Can Be Replaced Don’t worry about having to go around with missing teeth for too long if they end up being extracted, as you can replace them by investing in dental implants. However, you will also have to invest in bone grafting so the implants can stay in place. The dentist will basically have to install metal posts in your bones that can hold artificial teeth by becoming their roots. You won’t get the artificial teeth on the same day as the implants because you will have to go home to heal for a while, which could take a few months. Make an appointment with a dentist such as Aaron G Birch, DDS PC to find out if you have periodontitis and should consider dental...

Read More
Page 1 of 212